Get This Girl a Job, Uncategorized

Seeking out Mentors and Surviving Disappointment | S1E11 GTGAJ feat. Leah Fulmer

Welcome to the eleventh episode of Get This Girl a Job! In this podcast, Rosana and I interview recent college graduates to talk about the steps they took to get their first jobs in different industries. The questions follow the development of their career from their first year of college, to how their field of study changed, to the internships they had over the summer, to how they got hired for their very first job! We take turns conducting interviews, and every third week, we co-host a mini-episode answering questions from the audience.

Finding Your Support Network

I learned so much interviewing Leah Fulmer for today’s episode of Get This Girl a Job.

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Leah graduated from the University of Wisconsin Madison with a double major in Astronomy and Spanish. She is now living in Tucson, Arizona and working as a data reduction specialist at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory.

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Through her experience in astronomy and beyond, Leah has gathered wisdom on how to seek out mentors and build relationships with people that can be applied to work in any field. Since recording this podcast, Leah has decided to attend the University of Washington to pursue a PhD in astronomy this fall.

You can listen to the episode on Soundcloud and iTunes! Please subscribe and rate so that more people can find Get This Girl a Job!

To submit questions to be answered in our joint episode, fill out our form here or tweet them to us @xoxorosana_blog.

A huge thank you to Leah Fulmer for sharing her story, to Stephanie Dorris for designing our logo, and to Parker Mee for editing this episode.

Get This Girl a Job

Finding Your Path | S1E8 GTGAJ feat. Stephanie Bramer

Welcome to the eighth episode of Get This Girl a Job! In this podcast, Rosana and I interview recent college graduates to talk about the steps they took to get their first jobs in different industries. The questions follow the development of their career from their first year of college, to how their field of study changed, to the internships they had over the summer, to how they got hired for their very first job! We take turns conducting interviews, and every third week, we co-host a mini-episode answering questions from the audience.

Redefining Your Purpose

I had the pleasure of interviewing Stephanie Bramer for today’s episode of Get This Girl a Job.

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Stephanie graduated from Iowa State University in 2017 with a degree in apparel merchandising and is now working at Von Maur as an associate buyer. She found her way to fashion after transferring schools and shares her wisdom on being open to new experiences so that you can ultimately find the path that is meant for you.

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“Keeping your mind open and being willing to try new things is so important,” Stephanie says. “Maybe….don’t have a set plan and see where life takes you. Because you aren’t going to fail, and if you do fail, you are only one step closer to succeeding.”

Since recording this podcast, Stephanie has been promoted to junior dress buyer and is continuing to make a great contribution to the company.

You can listen to the episode on Soundcloud and iTunes! Please subscribe and rate so that more people can find Get This Girl a Job!

To submit questions to be answered in our joint episode, fill out our form here or tweet them to us @xoxorosana_blog.

A huge thank you to Stephanie Bramer for sharing her story, and to Stephanie Dorris for designing our logo.

Get This Girl a Job

Inclusive Astronomy and Leadership | S1E5 GTGAJ feat. Lauren Chambers

Welcome to the fifth episode of the Get This Girl a Job, the podcast that answers your questions about transitioning from college to the professional world by demystifying the post-graduation job search process.

Rosana and I interview recent college graduates to talk about the steps they took to get their first job in different industries. The questions follow the development of their career from their first year of college, to how their field of study changed, to the internships they had over the summer, to how they got hired for their very first job! We take turns conducting interviews, and every third week, we co-host a mini-episode answering questions from the audience.

Being a Mentor in STEM

I had the pleasure of interviewing Lauren Chambers for today’s episode of Get This Girl a Job.

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Lauren majored in Astrophysics and African American Studies, graduating from Yale in 2017. She now lives in Baltimore, Maryland and works at the Space Telescope Science InstituteHer many different identities include a scientist, a programmer, and a mentor, focusing much of her college experience on creating inclusive, positive environments for younger students. 

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Lauren has great advice to share about being a leader as well as finding out what you truly want to do by reflecting on your experiences.

You can listen to the episode on Soundcloud and iTunes! Please subscribe and rate so that more people can find Get This Girl a Job!

To submit questions to be answered in our joint episode, fill out our form here or tweet them to us @xoxorosana_blog.

A huge thank you to Lauren Chambers for sharing her story, and to Stephanie Dorris for designing our logo.

Get This Girl a Job

Campaigns and Communications| S1E2 GTGAJ feat. Chrissy Houle

The second episode of the Get This Girl a Job podcast is finally here! My name is Katie Melbourne, and Rosana and I created this podcast to help answer your questions about transitioning from college to the professional world by demystifying the post-graduation job search.

We interview recent college graduates to talk about the steps they took to get their first job in different industries. The questions follow the development of their career from their first year of college, to how their field of study changed, to the internships they had over the summer, to how they got hired for their very first job! We take turns conducting interviews, and every third week, we co-host a mini-episode answering questions from the audience.

Political Advocacy in 2018

I had the pleasure of interviewing Chrissy Houle for today’s episode of Get This Girl a Job.

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Chrissy graduated from Yale in 2016 and is now working in communications in Washington, D.C. She is active in politics, spending her senior year working on the Hillary Clinton presidential campaign between finishing up her classes.

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She has lots of good tips on searching for professional opportunities, adapting your plans after unexpected changes, and making your voice heard through political advocacy.

You can listen to the episode on Soundcloud and iTunes! Please subscribe and rate so that more people can find Get This Girl a Job!

To submit questions to be answered in our joint episode, fill out our form here or tweet them to us @xoxorosana_blog.

A huge thank you to Chrissy Houle for sharing her story, and to Stephanie Dorris for designing our logo.

25th Hour

Get This Girl an Internship | Ro&Co

For the third installation of Ro&Co, Katie Melbourne shares the steps she takes to get the coolest internships (like last spring at NASA!!!). If you want to learn more about getting internship and the job search process, check out our new podcast, Get This Girl a Job!!

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It’s that time of year again…recruiting season! When you’re knee-deep in resumes and career fairs, it may seem like that summer opportunity is just a distant idea. But with consistent organization and the help of mentors, that dream can soon become a reality! Here are my best tips for snagging that perfect position, and what to do once you get there.

Reach Out

Once you assess your goals for the summer, talk to people you trust to get their advice. You never know if professors, friends, or other mentors happen to know of a great opportunity for you! If you find a position at a company that seems like a good fit, use LinkedIn to search people who have also worked at that particular organization in a similar role. You may even be able to find alums from your school! Don’t be afraid to ask them to connect with you and talk about their experiences.

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Apply to Many Opportunities

A common roadblock to searching for opportunities is when your background matches the majority of the requirements but maybe doesn’t include one or two of the preferred qualifications for the position. Don’t let this stop you; you should apply to EVERYTHING that interests you! By demonstrating your ability to learn and your willingness to fill in those gaps, you can still be a standout candidate.

When you apply to many internships, you also have to stay organized! It helps to make a spreadsheet including the company name, job title, requirements, due dates, and application status. This way, you will never miss a deadline!

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Nail the Interview

After sending in a killer resume and cover letter, you’re ready to interview! Be sure to read up on the company and be familiar with their vision and mission. Think of some questions to prepare to show that your are interested and want to know more than what you can find by googling. Even if you are nervous, take a deep breath before answering each question so you can impress the interviewer with your confidence and enthusiasm.

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Logistics, Logistics, Logistics!

So you got an offer! YES! Now to other important matters: housing and transportation! Often, you can find housing by posting on an online forum or facebook group hosted by your university to ask other students if they are looking for roommates in the city where you’ll be working. You can also search for housing companies or dorms that are designed to help undergrad interns find a place to live for the summer. I ended up meeting some of my closest friends by living in an all-women’s boarding house in DC and spending the weekends touring the city together! Get familiar with any public transportation available as well by mapping out your commute to work every day.

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Reflect on your Experience

Once you start your job or internship, keep track of how you feel about your role, the company environment, and the overall experience. Don’t worry if you didn’t like what your were doing. The purpose is to figure out what you don’t like about a position in addition to determining what you really enjoy. Ask your boss to give you feedback on how you did so that you can continue growing in future positions as well. Be sure to keep in touch with the people you meet; they will become important mentors on your journey forward.

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Want to hear more advice on college, internships, and the job search process? Tune in to Get This Girl a Job, the new podcast Rosana and I created to help women gain the confidence to land their first jobs after graduation! Listen to our short teaser, then SUBSCRIBE so you don’t miss our first full-length episode on February 5th!

You can also find us on iTunes here!!

 

 

25th Hour

Working Woman: How to Network in 5 Easy Steps

Working Woman is a series of posts that focus on helping college women as we take our first steps into the working world. In this week’s installation, we’re talking about one of the most important things for college students to do, especially with only a couple weeks left in our internships: networking. Although I’m fairly new to networking (just got my real LinkedIn headshot this week), I am fortunate that after a semester at NASA my friend is a certified networking pro. Here is Katie’s beginners guide to networking.

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My name is Katie, and I am so excited to be featured on Rosana’s blog again! Taking time off school this spring to do an internship at NASA Headquarters in Washington, D.C. was an incredible experience that changed where I see myself in the future and taught me valuable skills about working outside of a classroom environment.

My goal today is to share some of the things I learned during my internship about building a professional network and some of the strategies I use to maintain my contacts even after an experience is over.

1. Set your goals

Before focusing on connections, it’s important to define your goals. Ask yourself where you see yourself in the future. What would you want to be doing? If you aren’t sure of the answer to that question, what opportunities and experiences might focus your vision and help you decide?

Once you have an idea of where you want to go, immerse yourself in communities related to your interests.

I’ve known since I was 11 that I was interested in astronomy. When I got to high school, I decided to become a member of our local astronomy club. I showed up to all of their meetings, volunteered for club-hosted outreach events, and gave a public presentation about stellar evolution to the club.

Because of my involvement, the leaders of the astronomy club nominated me for a national amateur astronomy youth outreach scholarship, and I ended up being funded to travel to the Astronomical League’s annual conference. At the conference, I met many incredible people, including the NASA Administrator (the director of all of NASA and senior space science advisor to the President) at the time, Major General Charlie Bolden, who ended up connecting me with my future boss at NASA Headquarters.

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When I first joined the astronomy club in my hometown, I didn’t know it would lead to so many opportunities down the road. Instead, I followed my interests and the people I met along the way helped lead me right to where I wanted to be.

2. Be prepared

So you know your goals and are involved in groups that interest you, but when opportunities come about (and they often come randomly), you need to be ready. It is important to always keep your resume updated after you get a new position, earn a new honor, or gain a new skill.

Unless you are at career fair specifically, you don’t need to have it with you, but it helps last-minute stress when you need to send it out to someone fast. One good way to keep track of what you do as well as to have an up-to-date LinkedIn. This should mirror your resume while offering more description about what you did for each experience listed.

One thing I learned fast while in D.C. was the necessity of having business cards. Most people have them, and if you have a good conversation with someone at an event it shows maturity and professionalism to hand them a card at the end.

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It also prevents you from offering an awkward explanation of why you don’t have any cards yet if someone hands you theirs (speaking from experience here). I recommend skipping the expensive official college ones and opting for something cheaper, more unique, and customizable.

3. Attend Professional Events and Classes

A great place to start meeting people is through networking-specific events. Many organizations host receptions, conferences, or talks that are prime opportunities for building those professional contacts. Subscribe to the email lists of any organizations that interest you and try going to any open events they host.

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On-campus resources also offer great advantages for students. Keep a lookout for emails sent out about career fairs or alumni networking days and try to attend as many as possible. My college even offered a special seminar series for those interested in learning more about networking. Through watching a video, doing a reading, and completing a personal mission each week, we learned through experience how to build lasting professional relationships.

4. In the Office

Although your goals may be different from where you are right now, it is essential to always bring your best to wherever you currently work or study. Through hard work, enthusiasm, and pushing your own limits, you are much more likely to stand out to your coworkers and supervisors, both in your own office and within the larger organization.

Your colleagues will also take notice when you express your interests and may go out of their way to help you pursue projects in those areas or attend relevant receptions and meetings with individuals from other organizations in that field. Never be afraid to ask about opportunities to take advantage of outside of work.

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At NASA, my supervisors knew what research I was interested in and had me working on projects in that area, helping me connect with astrophysicists I admire. They also brought me to many receptions for NASA’s partner organizations where I met many more people I will continue to keep in touch with far into the future.

5. Maintain Contact

I want to emphasize the importance of staying in contact with the people you meet. Immediately after getting home from a networking event or reception, be sure to make note of the name, contact information, job title, and context in which you met anyone you talked to.

It’s pretty nerdy, but I honestly keep a spreadsheet with all of this information that I update regularly. The next day, make sure to send individual emails to each person saying you enjoyed your conversation with her and that you hope to stay in touch.

It also helps to note a unique or interesting aspect of your conversation that you remember; this shows that you truly care. Especially if they write back, be sure to follow up to maintain the connection. Every few months or couple times a year, send them an email with updates on your progress or any new aspects of your professional life. They will appreciate knowing what you are up to.

Cheers for my new favorite mug (and the amazing Wright Lab coffee) ☕️

A post shared by Katie Melbourne (@katiemel25) on

Lastly, use the contacts you make wisely. It helps if you have something to offer that or are willing to work on a project with them if necessary. If you’ve stayed in contact and kept them updated and if they could help you achieve a goal you have through their connections with other people or organization, then don’t be afraid to reach out.

I hope that this has been a good introduction to the art of networking!

 

I am so grateful to Katie for sharing her networking know-how as a part of the Working Woman series. Katie has also written about how she meal planned without a kitchen during her summer in DC, and is the star of my marathon post.

Want more tips about networking, college, and internships? Have questions for Katie? Check out our podcast, Get This Girl a Job, where we interview recent college graduates about their job search process and answer your questions! Click here to listen to the first episode before it premiers on iTunes!

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Have you used any of these strategies before or think you might try to start?

Leave a comment below! You can find Katie on Instagram @katiemel25.

Good Luck!

Xoxo, Rosana

Wellness

Cooking Without a Kitchen: One Girl + One Microwave + One Meal Plan

As you know, I have been attempting to meal plan! I’ve been struggling with it, so this week, I asked my friend Katie to share her experience with meal prep. Working in Washington, DC for her spring semester, she’s had to learn how to live on her own and tackle everything from commuting to work to living without a dining hall (and she even found time to train for a marathon with me!).

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Hi everyone, I’m Katie, and I am super excited and honored to be doing a guest post for Rosana’s blog this week! I am in the middle of my sophomore year as a physics major when I decided to take a semester off to intern at NASA headquarters. I live in a dorm without a kitchen, so I have to be creative when it comes to making lunch. Here are the tips I’ve learned so far, and I hope you can find them useful too!

Snacks

I am training for a marathon with Rosana, and because of that I am ALWAYS hungry. I generally have snacks I keep on hand and mix and match them as I want. My favorite snack items involve little to no prep and are easy to eat on the go (banana, greek yogurt, almonds, apple and peanut better).

To store these for on-the-go use, I find random containers. The larger items I will keep in a pint-size mason jar, such as yogurt with chopped banana slices or apple slices with a small dollop of peanut butter on the side of the jar.

I also almost always have almonds with me. I am addicted to the strawberry duo ice breakers, so I use the empty containers to store almonds and throw them in my purse (fun fact, these cute, circular containers store almost exactly one serving size of 24 dry roasted almonds and if you pack it full, it will fit about 30). This helps keep portions in size and gives you a healthy snack option without needing to stop at a vending machine.

Salads- The One Meal You Don’t Need a Kitchen For

I go to the grocery store with the plan to prep four meals at a time. I try to eat one leafy meal a day (and since salads take forever to eat, it sometimes doubles as my snack through the afternoon).

For my salads, I use the quart sized Ball mason jars, which you can find in different sizes at Target or other supermarkets, and I like filling up the first 2 cups with a variety of chopped veggies of my choice (I am a big fan of crunchy pepper slices and sweet snap peas, though I also love a juicy grape tomato). I loosely pack in a mix of leafy greens to fill the other 2 cups of the jar. When it’s time to eat, I pull it out of the fridge and dump the jar’s contents into a bowl. If you like dressing, you can add it to the bottom of the jar before filling it up with veggies. Just make sure to keep the jar upright so the liquids on the bottom don’t get the leaves all soggy. To go with all the veggies, I next choose a protein.

Protein In the Microwave

I do not have a kitchen, so I have learned the magic of the microwave. I bought two silicone epicure steamers from Amazon, and I can have fully-cooked chicken in fewer than 15 minutes and steamed salmon in fewer than 5.

Salmon: I cook two-five ounce filets of salmon in the smaller steamer for 4 minutes with 3 slices of fresh lemon and a sprinkling of lemon pepper seasoning and it becomes a delicious lunch for 3 days. I just store the cooked pieces in a Tupperware in the fridge and pop what I want in the microwave each day for 30-45 seconds to warm it up, and put it on top of my salad.

Chicken: Raw chicken that’s cooked in the microwave is also totally safe to eat, but I learned that it’s best cooked after rubbed down with a little bit of oil and seasoning of your choice. The consistency is a bit more rubbery than when cooked in a pan, but it’s still a great option when you don’t have a kitchen or don’t want to watch the chicken while it cooks on a stove. You can cook the chicken breasts whole, but I prefer to cut them up so they cook more evenly and I don’t have to then cut them after. These take a little bit longer, with thawed chicken breasts needing between 10 and 12 min to steam in the microwave. You can also cook frozen meat in these steamers, either precooked or raw, which opens the door for lots of variety (turkey meatballs, I’m looking at you!).

Veggies, Grains, and Pasta (Oh My!)

Along with the hundreds of mug cake ideas on Pinterest, you can also cook veggies, grains, and pasta in the microwave. I often cook quinoa in the microwave steamers, just measuring out twice as much water as the dry quinoa, washing the grains, them popping them in the microwave for 8-10 min, stirring partway through.

This week, I am going to try chickpea pasta, which needs to be in water a couple inches deep and cooked for 3-4 minutes longer than on the stove top, but you don’t have to wait to bring water to a boil on the stove. Make sure to put the steamer on a paper towel (or if you are using a bowl, cover it, and put it on a plate) in case the water spills over a little bit. I like to taste-test the pasta as it gets close to the end of the time, and cook longer as needed.

Balancing Your Meal Prep

For meal prep, I bought 4 quart jars and 4 pint jars. On my fifth lunch of the week I always have a “fun” lunch and treat myself to something that fits in my nutritional goals and also something I have been craving. Usually, it’s a chicken and cheddar sandwich on multigrain bread from Potbelly’s. Yum!

Eating healthy isn’t about eliminating something from your diet. There are so many rules out there and it’s especially hard to follow theses guidelines on a budget and with limited cooking resources. The best things I’ve done in making moves toward a healthy lifestyle are consistency in my meals, packing one meal in advance that is primarily vegetables and leafy greens, and always having a healthy snack option on me.

 

You can follow Katie’s marathon training at @runforck on Instagram

Jazz hands!!

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